Abys & Other Cats

 

Okay, lets say you have a cat, maybe even an Aby and want a second (or third) feline in your home. Will it work? The best answer is maybe. We have seen multi-cat households work wonderfully and we have seen them fail.

There are no definite rules that will guarantee a successful introduction when you try to become a multi-cat household but we can give you a few suggestions. First, what is your criteria for declaring the introduction of a second feline a success? Cats can co-exist in many ways. They can be the best of friends or they can tolerate each other and be respectful of each other’s space or they can be confrontational and aggressive to a degree where they cannot peacefully live together. Many would consider the first two conditions a successful living arrangement but if you expect only the first you may be disappointed. Secondly, will your lifestyle allow you enough time to be with these cats? If the answer is no or maybe then you’re setting yourself up for problems.

In general older adult resident cats will be less likely to accept a newcomer. Often we get requests from owners of older Abys wanting to add a kitten to their household. This may unbalance the wonderful relationship that currently exists.

The high activity level of the Aby may stress the resident feline or (to show you how hard this is to predict) a calm resident cat may simply ignore the presence of the intruder. Cats are not herd animals, they are individuals so a second cat may not be welcome.

Owners often want their resident cat to have a playmate especially if the owner(s) spend long hours at work. Keep in mind that a cat can sleep 70% of the day. While the owner worries about the cat at home, the cat is often sleeping blissfully on the owner's bed. Adding a second cat may instead cause hours of stress and anxiety.

If two cats are desired it is best pair kittens or young cats. Likely they will romp and play together and then may form a lifetime bond. Mixed aged cats can also bond but it is less likely.